16 Jul
2014
Ian Plant By
Posted in: Africa, Namibia    44 Comments

40 Days of Africa

So far, 2014 has been ridiculously busy for me. In the first six months of this year, I’ve been to 15 countries, with photography trips to the following: Venezuela, Morocco, Botswana, Argentina, Chile, Namibia, Tanzania, and Rwanda (with non-photography visits or layovers in South Africa, France, Columbia, Ethiopia, Kenya, the Netherlands, and Canada). I’ve flown many thousands of miles, and taken many more thousands of photographs. And the second half of 2014 isn’t likely to slow down much, with trips planned to the North Slope of Alaska (I know, it’s part of the U.S., but Alaska is a foreign country as far as us in the Lower 48 are concerned), Brazil, Costa Rica—and possibly Ireland and Ecuador as well. And who knows where else.

Wow, I’m tired. I need some time off.

I guess what I’m doing right now qualifies as a break, so I thought it would be a good opportunity to share images from my recent 40 day photo trip to Africa, where I photographed Namibia (co-leading two photo tours there with Richard Bernabe for our new international photo workshop company, Epic Destinations), Tanzania, and Rwanda. So here are my favorite 40 images from the trip, one for each day I spent chasing light in the Dark Continent. Enjoy!

“Sunset Sojourn”—Namibia

I caught this image of a trio of elephants heading to a waterhole at sunset. I positioned myself to take advantage of the gorgeous backlight. Namibia’s clear desert air is simply the best for backlit situations! Etosha National Park, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 307mm, ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/640 second.

"Sunset Sojourn" - Etosha National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Touching the Sun”—Namibia

Here’s one from the famous Deadvlei area. The sun was rising just above the tree, so I used the resulting flare creatively, taking care to shade the lens from too much stray light. Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 47mm, ISO 100, f/16, 1/50 second.

"Touching the Sun" - Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Spirit of the Forest”—Rwanda

I photographed this mountain gorilla through a screen of leaves for a mysterious effect. I used a shallow depth-of-field to render the leaves as a colorful blur. Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Canon 70D, 109mm, ISO 200, f/2.8, 1/500 second.

"Spirit of the Forest" - Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda (by Ian Plant)

“Desert Solitaire”—Namibia

Here’s a shot taken in Namibia’s famous Namib desert, with its towering red sand dunes. I zoomed in tight to isolate a discrete portion of the overall landscape. Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 560mm, ISO 800, f/11, 1/250 second.

"Desert Solitaire" - Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Malicious Intent”—Tanzania

This cape buffalo looks like he is plotting to murder someone . . . probably me! Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Canon 70D, 560mm, ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/500 second.

"Malicious Intent" - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Desert Painting”—Namibia

This image was taken in a ghost town being invaded by the surrounding desert. A beautiful sunset was going on outside, so a lot of red light was reflecting into the building. Kolmanskop, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 16mm, ISO 100, f/11, 13 seconds.

"Desert Painting" - Kolmanskop, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Strength and Beauty”—Tanzania

I’m normally not a fan of overcast light for wildlife photography, but for this female lion portrait it worked great! Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Canon 5DIII, 473mm, ISO 800, f/6.3, 1/400 second.

"Strength and Beauty" - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Africa Nocturne”—Namibia

Here’s a simple night shot of the Milky Way; Africa night skies are the best! Spitzkoppe Mountains, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 16mm, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 30 seconds.

"Africa Nocturne" - Spitzkoppe Mountains, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“African Watercolor”—Tanzania

When I saw this white cloud passing by, I couldn’t resist a wider view of a pair of female lions. Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. Canon 70D, 200mm, ISO 125, f/4, 1/400 second.

"African Watercolor" - Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Rimlight”—Namibia

Here’s a shot of a cape fur seal rim lit by light from the setting sun. I intentionally choose a dark exposure to emphasize basic shapes and forms. Cape Cross Seal Reserve, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 560mm, ISO 320, f/5.6, 1/800 second.

"Rimlight" - Cape Cross Seal Reserve, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Searchlight”—Namibia

I framed this flamingo within the reflection of the setting sun for dramatic emphasis. Dorob National Park, Namibia. Canon 70D, 560mm, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/500 second.

"Searchlight" - Dorob National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Ngorongoro”—Tanzania

Here’s a view of a stunning sunset over the Ngorongoro Crater (a deep, volcanic crater, the largest unflooded and unbroken caldera in the world). Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. Canon 5DIII, 79mm, ISO 100, f/11, 1/13 second.

"Ngorongoro" - Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“African Huntress”—Namibia

I was lucky to find this female lion at sunrise; I caught her searching for prey in the first light of dawn. Etosha National Park, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 386mm, ISO 250, f/4.5, 1/320 second.

  "African Huntress" - Etosha National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Serengeti”—Tanzania

A wide angle view of elephants on the Serengeti plains. I was afraid they were going to bump the game vehicle I was riding in! Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Canon 70D, 18mm, ISO 100, f/8, 1/500 second.

"Serengeti" - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Peeling”—Namibia

Here’s another from the ghost town. I was attracted to the peeling paint, and the resulting textures and colors. Kolmanskop, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 17mm, ISO 800, f/11, 30 seconds.

"Peeling" - Kolmanskop, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Pachyderm Peccadillo”—Namibia

I shot this image of elephants crossing in front of a waterhole at sunset. I chose a dark exposure, obscuring the elephants, focusing the composition on the sunset skies and the elephants’ reflections. Etosha National Park, Namibia. Canon 70D, 117mm, ISO 100, f/3.5, 1/320 second.

"Pachyderm Peccadillo" - Etosha National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Hungry Hungry Hippos”—Tanzania

Sorry, I just couldn’t resist a reference to the famous kid’s game! These two hippos battled for several minutes before resuming their midday napping. Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Canon 70D, 560mm. ISO 320, f/8, 1/400 second.

"Hungry Hungry Hippos" - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Affection”—Namibia

A moment of affection between a mother cape fur seal and her pup on the Atlantic coast. I choose a dark exposure to emphasize the rim light from the setting sun. Cape Cross Seal Reserve, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 560mm, ISO 500, f/5.6, 1/500 second.

"Affection" - Cape Cross Seal Reserve, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Deadvlei”—Namibia

Here’s another shot from the famous Deadvlei. I shot this at the edge of the last light on the dead trees, some of which have been standing for almost a thousand years. Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 191mm, ISO 100, f/16, 1/20 second.

"Deadvlei" - Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Three’s a Crowd”—Tanzania

While photographing hundreds of zebra drinking at a river, I zoomed in tight to simplify my composition. Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Canon 70D, 560mm, ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/1000 second.

"Three's a Crowd" - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Desert Window”—Namibia

When photographing the ghost town, I was on the lookout for intimate details. I got inches away to accentuate the rippled sand in the foreground. Kolmanskop, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 16mm, ISO 100, f/16, 10 seconds.

"Desert Window" - Kolmanskop, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Cape Cross”—Namibia

This is an image taken in the Cape Cross seal colony, one of the most amazing sights (and smells!) on Earth. Cape Cross Seal Reserve, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 280mm, ISO 800, f/6.3, 1/500 second.

"Cape Cross" - Cape Cross Seal Reserve, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Siesta”—Tanzania

I found this female lion napping on a large rock. She reminds me of my cats at home! Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Canon 70D, 560mm, ISO 320, f/5.6, 1/320 second.

"Siesta" - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Grand Procession”—Namibia

Here’s a view of some flamingos strutting their stuff. Dorob National Park, Namibia. Canon 70D, 412mm, ISO 250, f/5.6, 1/320 second.

"Grand Procession" - Dorob National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Almost Human”—Rwanda

This is a portrait of a blackback mountain gorilla (a younger male subordinate to the silverback that leads the troop). Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Canon 70D, 200mm, ISO 320, f/2.8, 1/500 second.

"Almost Human" - Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda (by Ian Plant)

“End of the Hall”—Namibia

Another image from the ghost town; I choose a wide-angle view to emphasize the perspective lines leading to the center of the composition. Kolmanskop, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 16mm, ISO 100, f/11, 1 second.

"End of the Hall" - Kolmanskop, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Watchful Eye”—Tanzania

A mother elephant and her calf cautiously drink from a water hole. Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania. Canon 5DIII, 270mm, ISO 400, f/4, 1/400 second.

"Watchful Eye" - Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“A Place for Rest”—Namibia

Here’s an image of a male lion resting in some grass. I choose a high-key exposure to ensure adequate detail in the shadows. Etosha National Park, Namibia. Canon 70D, 560mm, ISO 640, f/6.3, 1/500 second.

"A Place for Rest" - Etosha National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Shadow Puppets”—Namibia

For this image, I had some fun with my workshop clients in the Spitzkoppe Mountains of Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 16mm, ISO 100, f/13, 1/100 second.

"Shadow Puppets" - Spitzkoppe Mountains, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Mini Me”—Tanzania

I couldn’t resist this mother elephant and her calf striking similar poses. Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Canon 5DIII, 442mm, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/320 second.

"Mini Me" - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Escher’s Palace”—Namibia

This scene reminds me of an Escher painting. Kolmanskop, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 16mm, ISO 100, f/14, 2 seconds.

"Escher's Palace" - Kolmanskop, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Duality”—Namibia

Namibia has some of the most amazing sand dunes in the world. I was attracted to the strong diagonal line formed by the dune crest. Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 47mm, ISO 100, f/16, 1/40 second.

"Duality" - Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Death in Africa”—Tanzania

Just having a little fun with my wide angle lens and a cape buffalo skull. Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Canon 5DIII, 16mm, ISO 100, f/11, 1/60 second.

"Death in Africa" - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

“Synchronicity”—Namibia

Here are some flamingos at sunset; moment is everything! Dorob National Park, Namibia. Canon 70D, 383mm, ISO 640, f/5.6, 1/500 second.

"Synchronicity" - Dorob National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Witch Dance”—Namibia

I got lucky at Deadvlei when some mist formed early in the morning. I choose a simple, graphic composition of just this one interesting tree. Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 200mm, ISO 100, f/22, 1/10 second.

"Witch Dance" - Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Gorilla Tangle”—Rwanda

I had a wonderful time trekking with mountain gorillas. Rwanda is a beautiful country, and I wish I had more than three days there! Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Canon 70D, 200mm, ISO 200, f/3.2, 1/400 second.

"Gorilla Tangle" - Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda (by Ian Plant)

“Quenched”—Namibia

Here’s a shot of a lioness pausing for a drink. I’m always on the lookout for capturing moments which tell a story or reveal something important about my subject. Etosha National Park, Namibia. Canon 70D, 533mm, ISO 200, f/5.6, 1/250.

"Quenched" - Etosha National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“The Walking Dead”—Namibia

I took this shot of dead camel thorn trees in Namibia’s Deadvlei. Most shots here are taken when there is light on the dune in the background; I shot this after the light had faded for a different look. Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia. Canon 5DIII, 143mm, ISO 100, f/22, 5 seconds.

"The Walking Dead" - Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

“Chillin”—Tanzania

I couldn’t resists snapping a shot of this olive baboon just hanging out on a rock. Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania. Canon 5DIII, 394mm, ISO 1250, f/6.3, 1/320 second.

"Chillin" - Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania (by Ian Plant)

“Sunkissed”—Namibia

Sunset is always a mad dash trying to find charismatic megafauna to photograph. On this particular evening, I had to settle for a lowly springbok—although I can’t argue with the results! The light was absolutely stunning, and I was lucky enough to get a perfect pose from my subject. Etosha National Park, Namibia. Canon 70D, 461mm, ISO 400, f/8, 1/250 second.

"Sunkissed" - Etosha National Park, Namibia (by Ian Plant)

Africa is a fantastic place and it should be on everyone’s bucket list. My workshop company, Epic Destinations, will be leading several tours there in 2015. We’ve got tours to Morocco and Namibia already planned, and we’ll be listing a few more soon, so stay tuned. I hope you can join us!

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Ian PlantAbout Ian Plant (393 Posts)

Ian Plant's photographs and instructional articles have appeared in a number of books, calendars, and magazines, including Outdoor Photographer and Popular Photography. Ian writes a regular blog column for Outdoor Photographer online, and he is the author of numerous instructional eBooks and videos. Ian leads several photo tours each year.


44 Comments

  • You and Africa are definitely a winning combination Ian. Amazing work as usual.

    • Ian Plant

      Very kind of you to say Jerry, thanks!

  • Every day during your 40 days in Africa I looked forward to seeing your image of the day. The diversity of the photos – animals, landscape, color and form, golden hour etc….what an absolute joy to be able to share your experience with you. All of these images are exceptional. Thank you

    • Ian Plant

      Thank you Karen!

  • I love these photos and have been following them as they have been posted during your trip to Africa. The composition is what really gives each subject it’s impact. My favorites? Synchronicity, A place for rest, African watercolor and Desert Solitaire for their ethereal and dreamlike qualities.

    I purchased Visual Flow and companion from you and have been studying them. I have not yet been able to incorporate that approach fully in my photographs, but your materials really set the bar for composition. Thank you for posting your photos. They are inspirational. Thank you. -Neil Crowley

    • Ian Plant

      Thanks Neil for the exceptionally kind words!

  • Brilliant – I particularly like the ones from near Sossusvlei and Kolmanskop which I visited in 2002 with my Nikon F3 and slide film. Not a patch on your images.

  • These are beautiful and inspiring images. I love them all but I think “Quenched” is my favorite. I had some interesting lion encounters when I was in Africa and have been fascinated ever since. I feel like she is looking right at me in this image and it gives me the shivers! Good job!

  • I thoroughly enjoyed seeing your images you posted while in Africa. Although the images of animals and landscapes images were all wonderful, my favorites were the images from the abandoned villages. Peeling was my number one favorite. The colors were very calming and I typically like images with peeling paint.
    With all if your international travel, it doesn’t look like you will be back to Acadia anytime soon. (I am the student who had to cancel last October due to a family member’s illness).
    I am still. hoping to catch one if your workshops. In the meantime, I enjoy your postings
    Debbie

    • Ian Plant

      Hi Debbie, thanks for the kind words. Unfortunately, I will not be returning to Acadia this fall. I’ll be spending most of October photographing polar bears in Alaska and jaguars in Brazil!

  • You must fill blessed to experience what most of us dream about, thanks for sharing your expertise.

  • Very inspiring shots…hope to get to meet you sometime.

  • These are all so wonderful, I can hardly pick my favorites. However, if pressed, I would say Spirit of the Forest, Desert Solitaire, Duality, Escher’s Palace, Africa Nocturne, Rimlight and Desert Window. What is so interesting is that only two of them are wildlife and the rest are landscapes. Not what one ordinarily thinks of as African photos. But I understand this because I was lucky enough to be in Namibia in 2011 and the landscape is thrilling. I would love to return.

    How about Zambia? Do you ever go there? I would love to visit Zambia with a stop afterward at Victoria Falls. Maybe Epic Destinations should consider?

    I am debating about the best lens for wildlife and birds. I am going to take a look at the new Tamron 150-600 tomorrow if B&H has one in stock but I also have located a used Sigma 500. It is more than the Tamron but less than a new one but is still pushing my budget. The Sigma would be sharper but the Tamron offers zooming and so is more flexible. Appreciate any advice. Currently I’m getting by with a 2X TC on a 70-200.

    • Ian Plant

      Hi Fran, I hesitate to give advice about equipment, as only you know what you need. If it were me, I’d choose the zoom. I prefer the flexibility of a zoom, and the Tamron lens is a surprisingly good piece of glass.

      • Thanks, Ian. I think you’re right about the lenses. I went down to B&H to check out both lenses today. The Tamron isn’t in stock yet so I couldn’t see it. But the Sigma, even used, is still too pricey and they won’t drop the price at all. Also I had the feeling that it would be very heavy and large to travel with by air and would require a gimbel head on my tripod which I don’t have and which is another $800 or so. I doubt I could hand hold it very long. I’m sure the Sigma would be sharper as it’s a prime but the Tamron will be easier to travel with, hand hold and lighter. It would also be much more flexible as wildlife can move erratically and vary their distance significantly in a short time.

  • Outstanding Images!

  • Hi, Ian.

    I agree with Debbie about the ghost town images. They are incredibly insightful and represent a side of Africa that is rarely captured through photography. I love the Escher reference as well.

    Jennifer

  • As I(we) have watched you through the years, it’s astounding how brilliant, breathtaking, captivating and touching your images can be. Many seem to tell a story. Many thanks for sharing with the world your special talent!

  • I’m speechless I was in Africa but had neither a companion nor economic means to travel every where! Just spent 2 days in Mara Masai n I fell in love with that place! No doubt when people say they love Africa why they say so!
    Brilliant landscapes especially that “Touching the sun” is simply amazing n those animal shots are priceless!

  • Ron Coscorrosa

    I was all set for a smart-ass reply but I just can’t do it. This is a stunning and diverse collection. Duality is one of my all time favorites of yours.

    One interesting thing I noticed – only one image of the bunch has colorful clouds. It’s very refreshing to see images that play up all the other (and often more interesting) qualities of light like these here.

    • Ian Plant

      I refuse to respond to anything less than smart-ass from you Ron. I expect better.

  • Stunning pictures, I really like the pictures you took of the abandoned village, the colors and clarity is just amazing and so is the composition. I love the back lighting on the elephants, and the Seals. I also really like the one of the lioness drinking, It looks like i can almost pet her. :)
    Thank you for sharing the pictures, Africa is one place I would like to visit one day.

  • A lot of interesting shots Ian! Nice job especially on those Kolmanskop images, love each one of those! I really like the rimlit fur seals too, especially Affection. That colony is a raw place with plenty of violence and death too, so I love the message/story there.

  • I have had the pleasure of being on 3 African Safaris since 1985. I have witnessed all of the scenery and wildlife so I feel quite blessed!! The only thing missing I think was the talent you have to take such splendid photos. You are right on the money — every photo tells a story!! Well done, Ian.

  • Evocative, inspiring, beautiful, fabulous images. Thanks Ian!

  • Wow! All are incredible shots! Makes me want to return to Africa and include Namibia. I love that you included camera and lens type and settings. You are one amazing photographer. I would love to be able to sit and plan a shot, set up a tripod and wait! We always seemed to be trying to see too much and missing the ‘worth the wait’ shots. I do have some nice shots but a longer reach than 300 would have been great while out on safari.

  • Your photography is incredible Ian. Absolutely stunning and beautiful photos! There aren’t words to describe some of the shots you have taken. You have been blessed with a truly amazing talent. Thank you for sharing your talent with us and the rest of the world. All the best.

  • Ian, these photos are absolutely amazing! Africa has been on my bucket list for a long time but it just moved much higher. I am a very amateur photographer and want to learn a little more before the expense of a trip like this. I’d love to go on one of your trips!

    • Ian Plant

      Thanks – would love to have you along sometime!

  • An exceptional and diverse set of photographs. What impresses me is your ability to show Africa in a different way than other photographers. I know you have hundreds more of equal quality, so I hope during your “free” time you will put together an ebook on Africa. It is one I would surely buy!

    Your new company has many trips on my bucket list. Any suggestions on how to pick a trip when I would like to go on all of them?

    • Ian Plant

      My first response is to say: why pick only one?! Seriously though, our upcoming Costa Rica workshop might be a nice place to start, just to get a feel for us and what we do. It’s really a photo “retreat,” an intensive workshop filled with lots of photography in one location rather than a tour. The rest of our current listings are tours that travel to multiple locations. Patagonia is a great tour, but we’re filled up for 2015, and almost filled up for 2016, so if you are interested in joining us to shoot the most epic landscapes on Earth, act fast! Morocco is going to be a lot of fun, but it is less nature focused than our other tours – we’ll be doing a lot of travel and street photography as well. If you liked the pics here, then Namibia would be an obvious choice. Iceland is, of course, a wonderful place for photography. We’ll be listing a few more tours soon, so stay tuned! Hope this helps.

      • Thanks for your reply; we have been to Costa Rica but not as a photo trip. Iceland and another trip to Africa are in our plans. Any chance of an Africa book and how your photos are examples of your Visual Flow concepts?

  • Absolutely stunning – I especially love Witch Dance and Synchronicity. I live in Walvis Bay and saw you and your group shooting the flamingos from the salt pan road that beautiful evening when the light was so perfect. Only realised it was you when I saw the pictures on FB a few days later! I love the way your passion for Africa shows in your work.

    • Ian Plant

      Too funny! It was nice to almost meet you!

  • I ‘ve always been a great fan of your work,but this series is awesome….great work, keep up your great work.
    God bless you..and keep on clickin.. :)

  • My Dad lived and worked in Tanganyika as it was back in the 50’s (and I was born in Tanzania, just a couple of years after independance) and through your pictures I can see why he loved it so much. Thank you.

  • I loved following your trip to Africa, Ian, and I’ve been taking notes to help prepare for my upcoming trip to Tanzania. Thanks for the inspiration and now I’m even more excited about the trip than I was before.

  • Just an amazing body of work from your travels, Ian. They all are unique, varied, and outstanding.
    My personal favorites are:
    Escher’s Palace
    Peeling
    and, Malicious Intent. But, all are equally excellent.

    • Ian Plant

      Thanks Morris! Hope you are doing well.

  • Great collection of images. Not a weak one in the set. All the shots from Kolmanskop really stand out. Seems like an amazing place to visit. The combination of “urban” decay and sand appears to be wonderful mix for photographs.

  • OUTSTANDING photos! Ian I would love to go with you one day to shoot all the wonders of Africa. Thank you so much for inspiring me.
    Sigi

  • I love every single one of these gorgeous photographs. this is a very diverse body of work.
    Your work is always inspiring and this series is amazing. Your use of light is sublime.
    I have been known to make a photo of some of the most uninteresting subjects simply because of the color of the light and the unique way it hits said subject.
    While I love all of these photos, “Duality” really played well along my senses. The animals are all very special, and of course the trees and shadows…. I’ll stop now as I’m sounding pretty redundant and gushing.
    Really excellent series. Thank you for sharing.
    –deborah

  • Breathtaking shots! You have a great eye fir just the perfect angle, and the lighting, contrasts, imposition…everything, serves so well to bring one into the scene! I feel almost as if there, a ble to feel the heat, smell the animals, feel the dust..

    Thank you for sharing your gifts and talents in these beautiful photos! Africa is my great dream, deep longing! One day!

    God bless.

  • […] just posted the final selection of my favorite 40 images from my recent trip to Africa on my blog, along with notes explaining my creative and technical process for each. That’s one […]